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Military Lodges

mrpierce17

KOP Council director / Lodge instructor
Premium Member
I have never visited a military lodge and I'm curious to know exactly how they work ?
1: are they on military bases
2: are civilian Mason's allowed to visit
3: do you have to be military or ex military to join
 

mrpierce17

KOP Council director / Lodge instructor
Premium Member
3) it depends really. In OR there was a military lodge up near portland that only allowed active and vets to join but all MMs were welcome. Mil lodges like those charted by the MWPHGLoOK are for all MMs serving in austre invironments

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Thank you we had a military lodge preform the opening this year at grand session I and I think all of the officers where either active duty or retired military
 

dfreybur

Premium Member
Thank you we had a military lodge preform the opening this year at grand session I and I think all of the officers where either active duty or retired military

There are lodges that are sponsored by the military and operate with the military. Such lodges move with their units. Prince Hall took his degrees in such a lodge. PHA jurisdictions tend to sponsor this type of lodge on military bases overseas. It's a nice symmetry of history. When the bases close these lodges tend to fold as the base is their sponsoring unit.

There are lodges that ask all of their members to be military, police, musicians and so on. You name the profession there may well be a lodge that specializes in it.

You'd have to know which type is meant.
 

MarkR

Premium Member
Prince Hall took his degrees in such a lodge.
Interestingly, I just finished reading "Landmarks of our Fathers" by John Hairston, in which he goes through the primary source documents regarding the beginnings of Prince Hall Masonry. It seems that almost nothing that we have always believed is true, including the Irish military lodge aspect. I recommend the book.
 

Go49ersuk

Registered User
Our grand daughter lodge in the Uk is Per Mare Per Terram 9355 a Royal Marine Lodge, there are other service lodges in the UK but to the best of my knowledge they don't meet on active Military Bases but are normally either sister, daughter or even grand daughter lodges to civilian lodges in nearby towns, this is I believe historical but obviously for security reasons it works well, although you don't have to have served in the military to join a military lodge some sort of affiliation is preferred.
 

Bloke

Premium Member
....., although you don't have to have served in the military to join a military lodge some sort of affiliation is preferred.

Not really true. Each lodge generally decides its membership criteria (within land marks) and military lodges are no different. One military lodge here I'm trying to encourage to "market" itself to historians.

Sadly, I recently discovered the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Lodge here is handing its warrant back
 

Travelling Man91

Registered User
Interestingly, I just finished reading "Landmarks of our Fathers" by John Hairston, in which he goes through the primary source documents regarding the beginnings of Prince Hall Masonry. It seems that almost nothing that we have always believed is true, including the Irish military lodge aspect. I recommend the book.
Question : I've heard so much about "what we believe and what we were taught isn't real" without going into great depts, does the book venture out to say Prince Hall was never a freemason ?
 

MarkR

Premium Member
Question : I've heard so much about "what we believe and what we were taught isn't real" without going into great depts, does the book venture out to say Prince Hall was never a freemason ?
No, not quite. There were a lot of irregularities in his making, but of course, in the 18th Century there were lots of irregular things happening (The lodge that George Washington was raised in was a "self-starter," operating without authority from any Grand Lodge for a number of years until they got a warrant from the Grand Lodge of Scotland in 1758, five years after Brother George was raised.) The irregularities involving Prince Hall and his compatriots was certainly "healed" when the Grand Lodge of England warranted them.
 

Bloke

Premium Member
No, not quite. There were a lot of irregularities in his making, but of course, in the 18th Century there were lots of irregular things happening (The lodge that George Washington was raised in was a "self-starter," operating without authority from any Grand Lodge for a number of years until they got a warrant from the Grand Lodge of Scotland in 1758, five years after Brother George was raised.) The irregularities involving Prince Hall and his compatriots was certainly "healed" when the Grand Lodge of England warranted them.
Thanks Mark - I was interested in the response.
 

Travelling Man91

Registered User
No, not quite. There were a lot of irregularities in his making, but of course, in the 18th Century there were lots of irregular things happening (The lodge that George Washington was raised in was a "self-starter," operating without authority from any Grand Lodge for a number of years until they got a warrant from the Grand Lodge of Scotland in 1758, five years after Brother George was raised.) The irregularities involving Prince Hall and his compatriots was certainly "healed" when the Grand Lodge of England warranted them.
Interesting. Can you explain the irregularities in him being made a freemason ?
 

MarkR

Premium Member
You really need to read the book to understand. The man who initiated them, although they truly believed that he was a "Grand Master," had no standing to do so, and probably just did it to get money out of them.
 

Bloke

Premium Member
You really need to read the book to understand. The man who initiated them, although they truly believed that he was a "Grand Master," had no standing to do so, and probably just did it to get money out of them.

I've heard that of today's lodges:)
 
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